Tag: datacentre

Synergy Research sees datacentre equipment spending fall

datacenterTraditional non-cloud datacentre equipment spending has plunged by 18 percent in the last two years according to new research.

Beancounters at Synergy Research have added up some numbers and divided by their collective shoe size and worked out that datacentre spending is now dominated by cloud.

Spending on public and private cloud datacentre equipment has grown to about two thirds of the total market.

Total datacentre infrastructure equipment revenues hit $30 billion in the second quarter of 2017, with public cloud infrastructure accounting for over 30 percent of the total and private cloud or cloud-enabled infrastructure accounting for over a third.

The public cloud has grown by 35 percent and private cloud by 16 percent over the last two years, traditional non-cloud datacentre hardware and software spending has dropped by 18 percent.

Synergy said the main beneficiaries of this market shift are the Asian ODMs, which in aggregate account for the largest portion of the public cloud market, its figures show. Cisco is the leading individual vendor in the public cloud space, followed by Dell EMC and HPE.

Dell EMC leads the private cloud segment followed by HPE and Microsoft, a trio which also control the declining non-cloud datacentre market.

Synergy chief analyst John Dinsdale said: cloud service revenues continued to grow by over 40 percent per year, enterprise SaaS revenue growing by over 30 percent, and search/social networking revenues growing by over 20 percent.

“It is little wonder that this is all pulling through continued strong growth in spending on public cloud infrastructure. While some of this is essentially spend resulting from new services and applications, a lot of the increase also comes at the expense of enterprises investing in their own datacentres. One outcome is that public cloud build is enabling strong growth in ODMs and white-box solutions, so the datacentre infrastructure market is becoming ever more competitive,” he said.

Scots target Microsoft and AWS with wee datacentre

cffb917de18558e64b59cacaf00f2f25Scotland’s “largest ever” datacentre is targeting tech giants AWS, Microsoft and Apple for potential customers.

Located just outside Edinburgh, the Pyramids Datacentre, will be 250,000 square feet when completed, with the choice of doubling its size.

So far, this sort of business has headed to Ireland which has offered tax concessions and had created an infrastructure that supported companies setting up shop.

Michael Hunter, associate director at Cushman & Wakefield’s datacentre group, sad that when the centre is built, Scotland will have the size and scale of infrastructure to attract Apple, AWS and Microsoft.

The new datacentre will be a Tier 3 facility with plans in place to develop on-site renewable energy sources. It will be constructed in three phases with 60,000 square feet of the site open now and ready for occupancy.

The Pyramids project aims to create a campus-style datacentre and digital hub.

The idea is to be at ground zero as the Scottish datacentre market grows, and becomes more sophisticated, it will become more and more important for Scotland-based companies to support these services locally.

 

France surrenders to Microsoft Azure Blitzkrieg

surrenderMicrosoft is pushing hard to get its Azure cloud offerings accepted in Europe and has announced that it will build its first Azure data centre in France this year.

Vole has written a $3 billion cheque to build its cloud services in Europe. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella told the assorted throngs in Dublin that the expansion would mean that Microsoft covers “more regions than any other cloud provider. In the last year the capacity has more than doubled.”

The French data centre comes a month after Amazon announced that it would also be building a data centre in France.

Nadella said today that Microsoft has data centres covering 30 regions across the globe, “more regions than any other cloud provider,” with the European footprint including Ireland, the Netherlands, the UK and Germany.

In Germany, its data centre is operated by its glorious Deutsche Telekom allies in a trustee model, a move made both for “digital sovereignty and compliance,” Nadella said, “and a real world understanding of what the customer needs.”

“We have a very particular point of view by what we mean by mobile first and cloud first,” Nadella said today “It’s about the mobility of your experience across all devices in your life [and] the way to achieve that mobility … those experiences… is only possible because of the cloud.”

Vole claims that it is the “more trusted, more responsible and more inclusive” cloud provider, in contrast to Amazon and Google.

HP intros open network switches

HPHewlett Packard said it has launched a line of open network switches for the data centre that gives service providers and Web scale organisations more flexibility for coping with cloud, mobile, social media and big data workloads.

The network switches include options such as choice of hardware and software and branded switches giving access to worldwide local support and services through HP Technology Services.

HP said the products are amongst the first in the category of branded white box switches.

The network switches will be sold to Web scale data centre customers through its partners Acton and Cumulus.

HP’s deal with Cumulus means it will provide Linux OS to cloud based data centres using tools and management from open source and commercial Linux communities.

The first in HP’s line with be two open network switches supporting 10G/40G spine and 10G leaf data centre deployments. The switches come with Cumulus Linux OS.

In the second half of this year, HP will expand the line, hardware and OS software options.

Intel earnings Jump: it’s memory bundling

Intel Q4_14_Results

Intel released its fourth quarter 2014 results yesterday afternoon with income jumping 39 percent on improved demand for personal computer and server system chips. The company allowed that it is  expecting a somewhat flat first quarter for 2015 which led shares 1.9% lower in after-hours trading. The PC Client Group’s earnings improved by three percent while the Data Centre Group’s earnings improved by 25 percent. Overall revenue increased by six percent  year-on-year and gross profit margin exceeded 65 percent.

Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters expected per-share earnings of 66 cents and revenue of $14.71 billion.

For the current first quarter, Intel projected revenue between $13.2 billion and $14.2 billion and gross margin of 60 percent, plus or minus a couple percentage points. Analysts, on average, were expecting revenue of $13.76 billion and gross margin of 61.2 percent, according to Reuters.

For the year, Intel projected revenue to rise by a mid-single digits percentage rate and achieve a gross margin of 62% of revenue, plus or minus a couple percentage points. Analysts, on average, were expecting revenue to rise 4% and gross margin of 63.4%, according to Reuters.

PC Client Group Improves

Intel’s integral attachment to the PC market greatly affected earnings as the PC market growth slowed and consumer market demand was satisfied with less costly tablets and high capacity smartphones. The uptick in PC demand last spring has had a positive effect on earnings and aided in the company’s turnaround effort to become “the” dominant supplier in the mobile market. With Intel’s 14 nm manufacturing muscle Brian Krzanich is now “loaded for ARM” vowing to place 40 million Intel chips into tablets now dominated by ARM Holdings PLC.

3D 256 Gb NAND-Flash Bundling?

No mention was made by Intel of its  recently announced 3D 256 Gb NAND-Flash devices. Intel has what can only be called an obsession with its ability to control the memory side of the sales equation without owning any of the fixed assets to produce it.

Analysts have been wondering why Micron was not more upbeat on the announcement; it is,  after all the controlling partner in Intel-Micron Flash Technologies, Inc. (IMFT). Sources indicate that Intel will most likely begin bundling Processors and Memory kits with Intel claiming the lion’s share of margin leaving Micron to its own pursuits with its share of output.

Last but Not Least

The Data Centre Group is rumoured to be the earnings darling of the coming quarters with sources indicating market moving announcements over the first half of 2015. Those announcements concern Intel’s SDN for Cloud Computing efforts…

 

 

 

Microsoft accuses US of double standards

janus1Software giant Microsoft has accused the US government of operating a system of double standards when it comes to snooping on other countries.

Microsoft’s executive Vice President and General Counsel, Brad Smith said that by demanding companies hand over customer data stored overseas the US government was operating a double standard that it would not accept from other countries.

Writing in his blog, Smith said: “Imagine this scenario. Officers of the local Stadtpolizei investigating a suspected leak to the press descend on Deutsche Bank headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany. They serve a warrant to seize a bundle of private letters that a New York Times reporter is storing in a safe deposit box at a Deutsche Bank USA branch in Manhattan. The bank complies by ordering the New York branch manager to open the reporter’s box with a master key, rummage through it, and fax the private letters to the Stadtpolizei.”

Microsoft has applied to the US Second Circuit Court of Appeals in its ongoing case challenging a US government search warrant for customer data stored in Ireland. Microsoft filed the appeal after a US district court judge rejected the company’s argument that the warrant is illegal because it calls for the seizure of emails stored outside the United States.

If the situation was reversed the US government would be furious if a foreign government attempted to sidestep international law by demanding that a foreign company with offices in the United States produce the personal communications of an American journalist.

He pointed out that the Secretary of State would fume that he or she was outraged by the decision to bypass existing formal procedures that the European Union and the United States have agreed on for bilateral cooperation.

And then, if the Germans had responded the way the US had done,  they would claim that they did not conduct an extraterritorial search – in fact we didn’t search anything at all.

“No German officer ever set foot in the United States. The Stadtpolizei merely ordered a German company to produce its own business records, which were in its own possession, custody, and control. The American reporter’s privacy interests were fully protected, because the Stadtpolizei secured a warrant from a neutral magistrate,” Smith said.

That would not satisfy the Americans because the documents held by the foreign company for safekeeping are private letters, not business records.

“And any attempt to take possession of those letters through a warrant – even one served on the company entrusted with those letters – would constitute a seizure by a foreign government of private information located in another country,” Smith wrote.

As far as the US Government is concerned, your emails become the business records of a cloud provider. Because business records have a lower level of legal protection, the Government claims it can use a different and broader legal authority to reach emails stored anywhere in the world.

Data centre readies for nukes

atomJust in case you thought that the fear of a nuclear attack was so 1980s it was not worth worrying about, a US data centre is advertising that it can survive a nuclear event.

The centre in Boyers, is a 2,000-sq.-ft. building purpose-built to protect against an electromagnetic pulse (EMP).  To be fair an EMP burst could also come during a solar storm, but it does indicate that someone is still worried about nukes in the US.

The company that built the facility is not disclosing exactly how the data centre was constructed or what materials were used. It appears that the structure has an inner skin and an outer skin that use a combination of thicknesses and metals to provide EMP protection.

So far, the only other data centres that protect against electromagnetic pulses are underground, or offer containers and cabinets that shield IT equipment from EMPs.

While it sounds groovy, it is not clear how concerned people have to be about EMP protection. Most solar storms are not strong enough to hurt electronics, though they could disrupt GPS and radio communications. Sure there could be an apocalyptic storm, but if that were the case, your data might be safe but there would not be a single working PC in the United States.

The last one which happened was the 1859 Carrington Event, a solar storm that disrupted and knocked out the telegraph.

Then there is the question of a nuclear attack, which means you have to start worrying about Russians and Chinese again, which is unlikely. Finally, you have to worry about terrorists getting their paws on enough uranium to build an EMP device. Then you would have to be worried that instead of detonating it in New York, where they would do the most damage, they would chose to drop it in Boyers.

If you are worried about those sorts of things then EMP protection is exactly what you need for your data protection. Of course, you are also the sort of person who wears belt and braces and probably does not leave the building out of a fear of badgers falling from the sky and killing you.

 

 

Datacentre availability is big deal for channel

datacentrebatteriesA survey commissioned by Brocade has surveyed 350 global resellers and systems integrators and concludes that datacentre availability is the primary concern of customers.

The survey, carried out with the aid of Avnet, TD Azlan, TechData, Arrow ES, edsLAN, the Immix Group, Mindware and Westcon showed that 60 percent of end users see fabrics as the future of networks. But their unwillingness to invest in datacentre networks is a big hurdle for enterprises.

A third of the channel players surveyed said their customers only invested in networks to support a specific new application or service.  Over one in 10 said they only invested when the network was already failing.

The survey identified five drivers of network investment: virtualisation, faster access to data and applications, greater bandwidth, supporting increasing data volumes and the need to support mobility.

Sixty percent of the channel players think fabric networks will be deployed in datacentres by 2020.

However, a third admitted knowing little about SDN, while 62 percent think budget constraints have a significant impact on companies investing in technology.  And 63 percent consider vendor financing as “vital” or “more important”.

brocade_infographic

EMC transformed itself thanks to Channel

7361653728_ac8edc50eb_cEMC, which was celebrating the release of new tech which could see it take control of the mid-range datacentre market, claims that its rise to dominance is because of its Channel strategy.

Talking to ChannelEye, EMC’s Vice President of Global channel sales, Gregg Ambulos said that a few years ago the company did not have an effective channel strategy and relied on its own sales team.

“That was probably OK when we had only one product but then Joseph Tucci took over as CEO in 2001 and wanted a different approach and a much stronger channel,” Ambulos said.

Since then more than 65 percent of EMC sales come through its Channel and in the area of mid-range data centre boxes.  Also it is starting to notice that partners are starting to defect from rivals like IBM to join in.

Part of this is a strong product line.  EMC holds most of the mid-range data centre business on the basis of its strong server offerings.

Ambulos thinks that this will become more obvious as the new VNX range hits the streets.  The new VNX is a much easier box to sell as it is faster and cheaper than previous incarnations.

He said that the technology changes to the VNX range were driven by EMC’s partners some of which were involved in actually crafting the developments.

Ambulos said that while EMC will be running channel incentive programmes to sell the VNX range, these will be comparatively low key.  Channel partners need very little incentive to sell the VNX range and just really wanted to get started.

 

Dell Sonicwall’s SuperMassive firewall works on LittleTiny power

dellsigDell SonicWall, the acquisition that rolled the company into Dell Software Group, has announced an enterprise class firewall that promises, the firm says, to deliver robust security, performance and scalability, the SuperMassive 9000 series.

The firewall is capable of providing threat protection at multi gigabit speds with close to zero latency, Dell Sonicwall said. Included in the series are the 9600, 9400 and 9200 models which all offer IPS and application control performance in speeds up to 12Gbps. Dell claims the products are power efficient with total cost of ownership and power, space and cooling requirements optimised with specifically for enterprise data centres.

Dell rolled out a client at the University of South Florida’s Pediatrics Epidemiology Center, which said that the organisation saved heaps of cash with the investment and performance increased “10-fold” after deploying.

Dell SonicWall’s exec, Patrick Sweeney, urged companies to consider the damages volume, form and sophistication of malware can have on corporate networks. “At the same time, enterprises struggle to balance the need for network access and performance with network protection,” Sweeney said.

Dell boasted that the SuperMassive 9000 series can get to threats before they enter networks, by casting its eye on all traffic worming its way in. This is largely thanks to Dell’s Reassembly-Free Deep Packet Inspection, or RFDPI, tech, which looks at every packet across all ports.