Tag: computacenter

Computacenter gets an eight percent boost

whirlwind-computerComputacenter saw its UK bottom line tighten up in Q3 with revenue up eight percent year on year to £33 5million.

Overall the group saw revenue jump 27 percent to £931 million with Germany once again the standout performer.

Revenue in the German business was up 26 percent to £453 million, while France’s sales pogoed 34 percent to £127 million.

Of the UK business, Computacenter said: “Whilst the UK is growing slightly slower than the group , the results in the third quarter clearly demonstrate an improved performance.”

Computacenter announced that the momentum it experienced across the group, particularly in Germany, in the first half of the year has been maintained if not improved during the third quarter of 2017.

“Whilst the fourth quarter is our most difficult comparison to 2016 of any quarter in the year, we remain on track for a record performance. New technologies, digitalisation and our customers’ appetite to invest is as buoyant as we can remember, which is obviously driving our professional services and supply chain services.”

The company warned that its target market’s desire to reduce operating costs, and therefore the cost of running their IT, has intensified which is eroding its contractual services base, thus increasing the need to invest in productivity and innovation to remain competitive. Whatever that means.

Computacenter has a management reshuffle

PokerGameComputacenter has appointed a new UK managing director as the outfit reshuffles its management deck.

Neil Hall, previously director of business enablement and contractual services, has taken on the UK role with Kevin James becoming chief commercial officer.

Andy Stafford has also re-joined Computacenter as chief operating officer. Stafford previously had been the company’s IT director in the late nineties.

Stafford worked at Deloitte and Virgin, before working at Accenture for a decade and then moving to Unisys.

Hall, who takes the UK managing director role, joined Computacenter in 2001 and held a number of roles before becoming group director of business enablement and contractual services in 2015.

James is now chief commercial officer. He  joined Computacenter in 1990 before leaving in 1999 and re-joining in 2005. He took on the UK managing director role in 2015.

Suppliers supporting G-Cloud 7

cloudThe number of suppliers using the G-Cloud 7 has jumped 11 percent even though some are concerned that it will help them win business.

G-Cloud 7 went live this week, and according to the award notice, the number of suppliers on the scheme reached 1,615, up 11 per cent on the 1,453 which were accredited on G-Cloud 6.

For those who came in late, the UK Government G-Cloud is an initiative targeted at easing procurement by government departments for cloud systems. The G-Cloud consists of is a series of framework agreements with suppliers, from which public sector organisations can buy services without needing to run a full tender or competition.

It started in 2012 and by May 2013 there were over 700 suppliers—over 80% of which were small and medium enterprises.

As you would expect, G-Cloud 7 has the usual suspects such as SCC, Computacenter, Kelway, Memset, Agilisys, Skyscape and Liberata.

Initially there were some problems after suppliers moaned about the framework placing restrictions on how much they can scale up their services, but it looked like the expected boycott never happened.

This is probably because filling in the paperwork for a G-Cloud application takes months and once you started you might as well finish.

But the strange thing about the framework is that few will make much dosh on it unless their sales teams are entirely focused on G-Cloud business.

Academia expands portfolio

salamancaEducation technology group Academia is launching a new commercial business team within Academia Technology Group as a reseller for enterprise customers.

Leading the team will be Richard Faucher, who has previously worked at PC World, Misco, Insight, and Computacenter, and has 20+ years in the IT sector. It will be branded Academia for Business.

Academia hopes to built on its reputation as an existing Apple, Toshiba, Adobe, HP, and Microsoft supplier but to expand with mainstream server and storage to help business customers.

In a statement, Faucher said account managers will focus on different markets, including publishing and media, telecoms and technology, law and finance, and sports and leisure.

Indebted 2e2 could be a dead duck

dead duckThe last of the remaining bidders for the broke 2e2 outfit have walked away saying that they are no longer interested in buying any of the company

The IT services group filing for administration and there was some optimism that the Newbury-based group would be sold to either Daisy or Computacenter.

In a statement, FTI, 2e2’s administrators said they had spoken to a number of parties who were interested in acquiring all or parts of the [2e2] business as a going concern.

But FTI said that it could not get an acceptable and deliverable offer to sell the business as a going concern and there is no further funding which can be made available.

Contractors and suppliers will not get paid and 2e2’s data centre clients appear to have been asked to stump up with more dosh to keep the servers switched on. According to Contractor, a letter had been sent out to clients telling them that not paying would result in FTI being “unable to maintain [2e2’s] Data Centre Infrastructure” and the whole lot will be switched off before any customers can get their data back.

However in its letter, FTI hinted that it will be impossible for customers to get their data back in a hurry as it had been hit by a number of requests from customers seeking to gain access to their data immediately. It thinks that the levels of data stored at the company will take up to 16 weeks to get out of the system, and if customers don’t pay up to keep the servers open they will lose everything.