Tag: AWS

AWS is marching on

Amazon Web Services’ revenue jumped by nearly half in Q2 and increased its market share over Microsoft and Google.

For the three months ending 30 June, AWS revenue increased 48 percent year on year to $6.1 billion and operating profit rose 79 percent to $1.6 billion.

Amazon’s CFO Brian Olsavsky said he expects AWS’ growth to continue as a result of a strong pipeline.

“We’re very happy with the results we’re seeing, the backlog that we see, the new contracts and new customers, and the expansion of existing customer business that we see”, he said.

“The business has accelerated in the last three quarters, and we’re seeing great signs in a number of areas.

“Customers are just branching out to a lot of new products from us. There are new areas such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, serverless computing and database and analytics [that] are really big.”

Rubrik scores AWS recognition

rub5_1Cloud Data Management outfit Rubrik has obtained Amazon Web Services (AWS) Storage Competency. This means that the outfit can provide technology to help customers work on AWS.

This moves Rubrick up the AWS greasy pole in the AWS Partner Network (APN) particularly in the Backup & Recovery and Archive area.  To achieve the AWS Storage Competency, APN Technology Partners must also deliver solutions seamlessly on AWS.

Rubrik Vice President, Business Development Ranajit Nevatia said that the move underscores the companies technical knowledge of AWS and track-record  of delivering customer success

“Our goal is to provide enterprises with a simpler, faster and future-proof cloud data management solution.”

Rubrik’s platform now supports multiple AWS storage classes for  Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), Amazon S3 Standard-Infrequent Access (Amazon S3 Standard -IA), and Amazon Glacier.

Rubrik’s platform lets both commercial businesses and government agencies to securely manage data from creation to expiration with end-to-end encryption. Rubrik supports AWS GovCloud and government infrastructure offerings from AWS, including advanced secure services like Commercial Cloud Services (C2S).

 

Gartner purges half of cloud service providers from Magic Quadrant

lightning-cloudGartner’s latest Magic Quadrant for infrastructure as a service (IaaS), saw eight cloud service providers dropped from the rankings.

Virtustream, CenturyLink, Joyent, Rackspace, Interoute, Fujitsu, Skytap and NTT were all vanished from the analyst firm’s Magic Quadrant, leaving only the six largest companies.

The number cruncher’s reasons for this sudden purge was that it wanted to create a more “stringent inclusion criteria” this year, which effectively excludes all but global vendors who currently have IaaS and platform as a service (PaaS) offerings.

This means Google, AWS and Microsoft Azure in the leaders’ box, with Alibaba, Oracle and IBM a long way behind.

“These changes reflect Gartner’s belief that customer evaluations are currently primarily focused on vendors for strategic adoption across a broad range of use cases. While customers still search for more focused, scenario-specific providers, these providers should be evaluated in the context of that specific workload, rather than compared in a broader market context”, according to the analyst firm.

 

UK first to see VMware and Amazon Web Services (AWS) partnership

krayVMware and Amazon Web Services (AWS) have launched their European partnership and the UK the first market to go live.

VMware Cloud on AWS was first announced in 2016 and puts VMware’s private cloud available on AWS’ public cloud infrastructure. It has been kicking around the US since last year, and the UK is the second market to see it.

It gives VMware partners the ability themselves to extend using native AWS service capabilities. So far two partners have signed up for the programme, one of which is Softcat.

The launch sees VMware expand its Solution Provider and Cloud Provider programmes to include VMware Cloud on AWS, and release a new competency for the service.

VMware said that its partnership with AWS shows its belief that there is “no question” hybrid cloud will ultimately rule.

AWS that the public cloud vendor expects the “vast majority” of workloads to run in the public cloud eventually.

VMware Cloud for AWS will soon be available in other European markets, with a launch in Germany set to take place soon.

 

AWS, VMware, Microsoft and Symantec are pants vendors

hqdefaultAWS, APC, Citrix, Huawei, McAfee, Microsoft, Symantec, Veritas and VMware are lowest-scoring vendors in a channel management survey according to research outfit Canalys.

The Canalys Leadership Matrix was based on more than 2,700 responses from EMEA channel partners who were asked to rate their vendor partners across ten areas of channel management.

Canalys divided the results into four: “Champions”, “Growers”, “Contenders” and “Stragglers”, the survey also judges vendors on how their standing in the Leadership Matrix has changed.

Nine companies were placed in Canalys’ “Stragglers” quadrant, reserved for vendors that “have shown significant weakness in areas of channel management” or “have seen a deterioration in partner relationships, either by choice or mistake”.

AWS, APC, Citrix, Huawei, McAfee, Microsoft, Symantec, Veritas and VMware were all named as channel Stragglers in the survey.

Vole and VMware, two firms which have “highly successful businesses built on sales via partners,” were named and shamed in the report with Canalys saying that there was “a growing wave of channel dissatisfaction with both brands”.

Dell EMC’s appointment as an “official distributor” of VMware licences last year dealt a blow to its resellers and distributors and likely prompted a fall from grace among partners.

Canalys claimed that Microsoft, meanwhile, has been “accused of squeezing channel margins” through its Cloud Solution Provider partner programme.

The top-scoring vendors in the survey included Fujitsu, Cisco, Lenovo, Palo Alto Networks and Veeam. Canalys said that  Cisco’s quality of technical support for partners remains unparalleled when compared with its competitors, while Lenovo’s “Channel 2.0” initiative, which sought to simplify partner incentives, was well received by the channel.

Apple’s  overall rating was still relatively low compared with its peers, and its resellers still suffer from “low margin potential” and “rigid terms and conditions” from the vendor.

 

SHI cleans up in the UK

3436142cf514e59f3acf71e47579299aUS reseller SHI International has reported a 12 percent annual spike in revenues, and the UK was its star.

SHI’s revenue in 2017 topped $8.5 billion making it a record year for the firm. While its corporate and SMB division witnessed 21 percent year on year revenue growth, it was the UK which drove its international business with 28 percent growth.

SHI had 10 per cent year on year growth for its commercial and strategic enterprise division, while its public sector unit grew five percent.

CEO Thai Lee said that for the last 18 months, SHI made significant investments in onboarding additional resources and expertise in support of public and hybrid cloud solutions featuring technologies such as AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud.

“Through intense in-house training and aggressive talent acquisition, we’ve become a holistic resource for customers, capable of supporting both the technology and the business aspects needed to enable and support advanced IT solutions,” said Lee.

Microsoft remained SHI’s top partner in 2017, growing 15 percent over 2016, while Amazon Web Services was the fastest growing top-tier partner for the second year in a row, with a 62 percent leap in the past year.

Cisco saw the second-fastest growth of its top vendors, with revenue 33 percent higher than in 2016. Dell, HP Inc., VMware, Lenovo, Adobe, Apple, HP Enterprise, and Symantec rounded out the list of SHI’s top 11 partners.

Cloud giants need channel for next phase

ae75610647df615b38555f1bc5ac6896Market analyst outfit Canalys says that the cloud giants such as AWS, Microsoft and Google are embracing the channel as they look to capitalise on the “next phase” of cloud adoption.

AWS, Microsoft and Google grew their cloud infrastructure revenues by 43 percent, 93 percent and 74 percent respectively in Q1, year on year, as the overall market rose by 42 percent to $11.4 billion, Canalys said.

But the big three have worked out that building an indirect business will be the only way to maintain that order of growth,

Canalys principal analyst Matthew Ball said that the next phase of cloud adoption means that they are looking at corporate and mid-market accounts, and for that they need greater reach and scale, and to do that they need the channel.

Big cloud providers, AWS and Google have not come from an enterprise IT background so they are starting to mature their partner programmes and channel engagements.

They are looking to focus on that more because they recognise that the channel has those relationships with customers.

Canalys thinks the channel will be a part of their go-to-market strategies, especially if they want to maintain their high levels of growth each quarter and year.

Canalys pegged AWS’ Q1 cloud infrastructure sales at over $3.5 billion but the market leader’s success need not be at the cost of the channel, said Ball, who argued that the rise of cloud has in some cases expanded the role played by resellers.

Ball said that the channel has made good business selling datacentre infrastructure in the past, and will do so.

Cloud is another choice for customers in terms of how they operate their IT environments and, for sure, it’s a concern for channel partners. Some partners have been affected by cloud and others changing their business model to develop consultancy or professional services to help their customers define a cloud environment.

Dell in the clouds again

Michael DellGrey box shifter Michael Dell talked up the importance of a ‘multi-cloud’ world and waded in to AWS, Microsoft, and Google by claiming that, for many customers, “public cloud is twice as expensive as on-premise”.

Dell said that while all styles of cloud computing have their merits and applications, customers should not relytoo heavily on any one model, – particularly public cloud.

“If you have a public cloud-first and -only strategy, you will find yourself uncompetitive in the long term. On-premise offers automation capabilities on an unprecedented scale. Many customers have already told us that the public cloud is twice as expensive as on-premise,” he said.

David Goulden, president of Dell EMC, added that Dell’s cloud offering addresses not only generalist productivity and business applications, but also core applications that many enterprises would not typically consider suitable for the cloud arena.

“Most clouds target the millions of general-purpose applications,” he said. “Our cloud strategy targets those, but also targets performance-intensive, mission-critical applications that most customers would not [otherwise] consider running on a cloud or as-a-service basis. We, uniquely, have a hybrid cloud strategy for all your applications.”

Dell EMC is adding its 14th generation of its PowerEdge range of servers this summer and the new VMAX 950F all-flash storage array.

The vendor also boosted its VxRail suite of hyper-converged technology, including the launch of a single-processor unit which allows businesses to invest in hyper-converged infrastructure for a capital investment as low as $25,000.

Dell Financial Services is to a launch a payment offering for hyper-converged infrastructure providing customers with the option of “cloud-like consumption” of the technology.

Vendors need to fight public cloud propaganda

The battle for the hearts and minds of public cloud users is being won by AWS, Google and Microsoft, and MSPs need to fight back before they become unstoppable.

Canalys CEO Steve Brazier told the outfit’s Channel Forum that the traditional IT industry has to fight back to remind customers that there is an alternative.

He said that Dell, HPE, Cisco and Oracle were all talking about cloud, but there is a danger that they, along with their channel partners, will be swerved in favour of AWS, Google and Azure because the buyer has been swayed by them.

There was a danger that the three big public cloud providers could become “too big to fail” with too many customers putting data through their platforms.

His logic is fair enough. In the last year AWS grew by 59 per cent, while both Microsoft with Azure had grown their cloud by 100 per cent.  All this was on the back of the giants leaning on their clouds.

Basically it means that Lenovo, Dell, HPE and others doing more to counteract the public cloud argument and to work in a more co-ordinated way to present an alternative PR message.

Customers need to be worried that will be locked in to platforms and if one of these big companies go down then millions could be hit.

Google expands its cloud offerings worldwide

Google's Eric "Google Glass" SchmidtSearch Engine Google is expanding its data centre operations worldwide, announcing more than 10 new Google Cloud Platform regions to take on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

The first two new regions are set for Oregon in the United States and Tokyo in Japan, and are expected to be up and running by the end of 2016. The rest will follow in 2017.

Varun Sakalkar, Google Cloud’s product manager said that the outfit was opening these new regions to help Cloud Platform customers deploy services and applications nearer to their own customers, for lower latency and greater responsiveness.

“With these new regions, even more applications become candidates to run on Cloud Platform, and get the benefits of Google-level scale and industry leading price/performance,” he said.

The cloud business is getting more cutthroat with AWS, Google, and Microsoft engaged in a bitter price war in recent years, attempting to undercut each other in order to attract customers.

Google has made moves this year to boost its cloud infrastructure strategy and is thinking of buying a number of cloud companies for acquisition, endeavouring to diversify its software and infrastructure offerings to match those of Microsoft Azure and AWS.

Interestingly, AWS has 12 regions globally, the same number Google today announced it was targetting. IBM will soon have 15 major data centres around the world.

Google has just four cloud regions, but with that sphere of influence set to quadruple into new markets across the globe, international customers are about to have a much tougher choice when it comes to choosing a public cloud provider.

 

Microsoft to build Azure UK data centre

Every silver has a cloudy liningSoftware giant Microsoft is building a new UK data centre for its Azure cloud – the announcement follows something similar from AWS.

Vole wants its cloud services based in the UK beginning in 2016 and AWS will have it ready by the by the end of 2016 (or early 2017).

Vole is behind AWS in cloud services but the distance between the pair is huge.

Setting up in the UK makes a lot of sense. London’s status as a financial hub makes it attractive market for cloud vendors, and having a local region (composed of multiple data centres) mimimises latency.

Microsoft is a US corporation there may be circumstances when the US government can demand access to data. This is less likely to be possible if the data is kept in a local data centre.

If the US does succeed in getting court orders for the data stored in Europe chances are the EU would ban American companies running data centres. This would be too much of a political hot potato for the US government which is currently attempting to re-negotiate its safe-harbour status in Europe having lost it due to its spying antics.

Microsoft has the Ministry of Defence signed up as its first customer, which is probably why it has to have the data kept within the UK.

The department will be migrating to a “private instance” of Office 365, hosted partly by HP and in part by the new UK Azure region.